Bombing was an ever-present danger during the Second World War (1939 to 1945). The most devastating bombing raid on Canterbury was known as the ‘Baedeker Blitz’.

Continue reading

Now extinct, the Mammoth could reach heights in the region of 4m and weigh up to 8 tonnes. Both male and females bore tusks, which could grow at a rate of about 2.5 to 15.2 cm (1 to 6 in) per year.

Continue reading

In 1685 when the Edict of Nantes was revoked, a family of French Protestants from La Rochelle left France in an open boat and drifted for many days until they landed on Guernsey. Their prized possession, this Bible, survived the journey, and was subsequently given to the church at Canterbury.

Continue reading

You may have heard of Robert Stephenson (1803–1859), a man frequently referred to as ‘the greatest engineer of the 19th century’, but did you know that one of his most famous creations was built exclusively for use in the Canterbury District.

Continue reading

This remarkable building, housing the museum’s vast collection, has lived through six centuries of the city’s history. Rebuilt in its current form in 1373, it stands today as one of Canterbury’s finest surviving medieval buildings.

Continue reading