When a mosaic pavement, with geometrical flower patterns and interlaced borders, was found in the aftermath of the Canterbury blitz bombings, archaeologists knew these had to be the remains of a very large and costly Roman town house.

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In the 1970s an excavation within Canterbury’s city walls unearthed something so unusual it remains a mystery to this day. When archaeologists dug down they discovered the grave of two Roman cavalry soldiers. However, this was no ordinary grave and suspicions over the cause of death were raised. Unknowingly, archaeologists had just unearthed a real Roman Murder Mystery.

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Trade was vital to Ancient Rome and the Empire was criss-crossed with trade routes. It was through these trade routes that the Romans acquired much of the materials used to create the impressive array of jewellery that we see today.

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Declared as one of the key finds of 2012 by the British Museum in recognition of its significance and rarity, this remarkably complete soldier’s helmet from the mid first century BC is the finest example of its kind ever found in Britain.

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When excavating under the cellars of shops destroyed by Second World War bombing, archaeologists discovered parts of a very large Roman town house. Built about AD 70, the house had many costly features – one of which was a hypocaust.

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