Owl Butterfly

This Owl Butterfly on display is commonly known as the Brazilian Little Owl. It is a South American butterfly and is often found in rainforests from Guatemala to northern Argentina. They are known for their eye-like markings, resembling owls’ eyes, which not only deceive predators but draw attention away from...

Continue reading

Gold from the Klondike

Displayed in the gallery are two types of Gold – but could you tell the difference between them? One is the type we all know, love and aspire to possess and the other is a deceiving natural imitation often mistaken for the real deal...

Continue reading

Sheep in the Snow

The last of Thomas Sidney Cooper’s works, Sheep in the Snow was left unfinished on the easel. If you look closely, the pencil marks under the paint can still be seen. Even at the age of ninety-nine, and with slightly failing eyesight, Cooper captures very realistic sheep in the midst...

Continue reading

Separated, but not Divorced

Known as Charlie the Bull, this painting is the most popular of the Thomas Sidney Cooper works of art at the Beaney. It was painted between 1874 and 1882 and is one of the largest amongst the collection. The bull in this painting is a prize Shorthorn known as Charlie,...

Continue reading

Narwhal Tusk

Described as the legendary “unicorn of the sea”, this narwhal tusk was given to Reverend Holman, who took part in the search for Sir John Franklin’s doomed Artic expedition to find the North-West passage.

Continue reading

Chinese Pangolin

Befitting the ethos of the Cabinet, this Chinese Pangolin is indeed an unusual treat for the eyes and inquisitive mind. Now critically endangered, the specimen on display is a rare chance to see an animal which many of us are unlikely to ever see in the wild. The Chinese Pangolin...

Continue reading

Fossil Fish

Given to Francis Crow (1755-1835), a local clockmaker, inventor and geologist from Faversham, by the Royal Institute in Paris, this Fossil Fish is an outstanding example of its kind and may have been part of the famed Haeberlein Collection looted by Napoleon. This fossil was found in Monte Bolca, Italy,...

Continue reading

The Study

Early collectors were often amateurs who wanted to learn about the world by looking more closely at things. This thirst for knowledge directly resulted in the Wunderkammer, also known as ‘The Cabinet of Curiosities’: personal collections of unusual and inspiring objects that were the historical precursor to the museum.

Continue reading

It was the time of roses by David Murray

Likened to Constable, Sir David Murray RA (1849 – 1933) was a Royal Academician and very prolific Scottish landscape painter. Having studied at the Glasgow School of Art under Robert Greenlees, he moved to London in 1882 where he was an immediate success...

Continue reading

The Little Girl at the Door by Harriet Halhed

Born in Australia, Harriet Halhed (1850-1933) came to England as an orphan, aged six, to be brought up by her aunt in Harbledown, near Canterbury. She went on to train at the Sydney Cooper School of Art, the Royal College of Art in London and then with artist Louis Deschamps...

Continue reading

SUPPORT US - DONATE TODAYFIND OUT MORE