When excavating under the cellars of shops destroyed by Second World War bombing, archaeologists discovered parts of a very large Roman town house. Built about AD 70, the house had many costly features – one of which was a hypocaust.

Continue reading

This figurine of a seated female, just 16 centimetres tall, was dug-up by a gravedigger in St Dunstan's more than 150 years ago, and was found at the site of a cremation burial. She is known as the Dea Nutrix – the Nursing Goddess.

Continue reading

Roman glass production developed from Hellenistic* traditions, initially concentrating on the production of intensely coloured cast glass vessels. By the end of the 1st century AD large scale manufacturing meant glass was readily available throughout the Roman world.

Continue reading

Pottery makers flourished during the first and second centuries AD. Archaeologists have discovered kilns on the outskirts of Roman Canterbury, near the sources of clay, water and firewood, where a range of cooking wares and tiles were produced. The local potters worked in Roman styles which would have supported the cooking methods of the time including preparing and cooling food.

Continue reading

SUPPORT US - DONATE TODAYFIND OUT MORE