This figurine of a seated female, just 16 centimetres tall, was dug-up by a gravedigger in St Dunstan's more than 150 years ago, and was found at the site of a cremation burial. She is known as the Dea Nutrix – the Nursing Goddess.

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Roman glass production developed from Hellenistic* traditions, initially concentrating on the production of intensely coloured cast glass vessels. By the end of the 1st century AD large scale manufacturing meant glass was readily available throughout the Roman world.

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Pottery makers flourished during the first and second centuries AD. Archaeologists have discovered kilns on the outskirts of Roman Canterbury, near the sources of clay, water and firewood, where a range of cooking wares and tiles were produced. The local potters worked in Roman styles which would have supported the cooking methods of the time including preparing and cooling food.

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The tale of Rupert Bear begins with the story of the Caldwell Family. The Caldwell’s were a family of artists who worked at Canterbury Cathedral on the restoration of stained-glass windows. Their daughter, Mary, went on to attend Simon Langton Girls’ School, then studied at the Sidney Cooper School of Art in Canterbury before going on to marry a man named Herbert Tourtel.

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Created by BAFTA award-winning Peter Firmin and Oliver Postgate through their company Smallfilms, Bagpuss was filmed in Firmin’s barn in Blean, just outside Canterbury.

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