Group Visits

Enjoy great days out designed specifically for groups! Whether you are a Group Travel Organiser or Tour Operator, Canterbury Museums and Galleries have experiences designed to suit your needs. For visits to both Canterbury Roman Museum  or The Beaney , our dedicated team are always happy to cater to meet your group requirements wherever possible....

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Silverware

Shortly after 410 AD, a hoard of treasure was buried near the London Gate within Canterbury's city walls. Its owner no doubt hoped for safer days to return but for whatever reason the owner didn’t return and the treasure lay unclaimed for 15 centuries.

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Mosaics

When a mosaic pavement, with geometrical flower patterns and interlaced borders, was found in the aftermath of the Canterbury blitz bombings, archaeologists knew these had to be the remains of a very large and costly Roman town house.

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Double Sword Burial

In the 1970s an excavation within Canterbury’s city walls unearthed something so unusual it remains a mystery to this day. When archaeologists dug down they discovered the grave of two Roman cavalry soldiers. However, this was no ordinary grave and suspicions over the cause of death were raised. Unknowingly, archaeologists...

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Jewellery

Trade was vital to Ancient Rome and the Empire was criss-crossed with trade routes. It was through these trade routes that the Romans acquired much of the materials used to create the impressive array of jewellery that we see today.

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Iron Age Helmet

Declared as one of the key finds of 2012 by the British Museum in recognition of its significance and rarity, this remarkably complete soldier’s helmet from the mid first century BC is the finest example of its kind ever found in Britain.

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Hypocaust

When excavating under the cellars of shops destroyed by Second World War bombing, archaeologists discovered parts of a very large Roman town house. Built about AD 70, the house had many costly features – one of which was a hypocaust.

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Dea Nutrix

This figurine of a seated female, just 16 centimetres tall, was dug-up by a gravedigger in St Dunstan's more than 150 years ago, and was found at the site of a cremation burial. She is known as the Dea Nutrix – the Nursing Goddess.

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Glassware

Roman glass production developed from Hellenistic* traditions, initially concentrating on the production of intensely coloured cast glass vessels. By the end of the 1st century AD large scale manufacturing meant glass was readily available throughout the Roman world.

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Pottery

Pottery makers flourished during the first and second centuries AD. Archaeologists have discovered kilns on the outskirts of Roman Canterbury, near the sources of clay, water and firewood, where a range of cooking wares and tiles were produced. The local potters worked in Roman styles which would have supported the...

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